Danish Professor Says United Nations Could Use Military To Enforce Climate Change Agenda

A prominent professor of international relations at the University of Copenhagen has suggested the United Nations could use military force to enforce its climate change agenda.

Professor Wæver had an interview with ABC News in Australia and said that nations who are not taking action on climate change could become engaged with the United Nations in armed conflict as it decides to enforce its agenda.

“The United Nations Security Council could, in principle, tomorrow decide that climate change is a threat to international peace and security,” the professor said.

“And then it’s within their competencies to decide ‘and you are doing this, you are doing this, you are doing this, this is how we deal with it,’” he said.

“That’s what happens when something becomes a security issue, it gets the urgency, the intensity, the priority, which is helpful sometimes, but it also lets the dark forces loose in the sense that it can justify problematic means,” he said.

Weaver said that the urgent nature of addressing climate change could lead to international action to enforce its standards.

“If there was something that was decided internationally by some more centralized procedure and every country was told ‘this is your emission target, it’s not negotiable, we can actually take military measures if you don’t fulfill it,’” he said.

Then you would basically have to get that down the throat of your population, whether they like it or not,” he says.

“A bit like what we saw in southern Europe with countries like Greece and the debt crisis and so on,” Weaver said.

“There were decisions that were made for them and then they just had to have a more or less technocratic government and get it through,” Breitbart News reported.

Professor Wæver made his predictions last month on the eve of the United Nations COP25 climate conference now underway in Madrid, Spain.

Almost 25,000 delegates and 1500 journalists have flown into the Spanish capital to attend the two-week long meeting.

COP25 will consider a wide agenda of global action including implementing taxes on developed countries to transfer wealth to nations dealing with “the cost of drought, floods and superstorms made worse by rising temperatures,” as Breitbart News reported.

President Donald Trump officially withdrew the U.S. from the Paris Climate Accord, which COP25 is a continuation thereof,  in October as part of an election promise to voters, saying he was “elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris.”

“Imagine these kinds of fires that we are seeing happening [in Australia] in a part of Africa or South-East Asia where you have groups that are already in a tense relationship, with different ethnic groups, different religious orientations,” Weaver said.

“And then you get events like this and suddenly they are not out of each other’s way, they’ll be crossing paths, and then you get military conflicts by the push,” he said.

“It exacerbates the drivers of conflict by deepening existing fragilities within societies, straining weak institutions, reshaping power balances and undermining post-conflict recovery and peace building,” he said.

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